Woodloch’s Halloween Safety Tips and Pumpkin Carving Guide!

It’s once again that magical time of year! We’re all picking pumpkins out of patches, costume shopping, and maybe even boldly catching a haunted hayride or two- it’s HALLOWEEN! It’s always an exciting season for us, as we are sure it is for our guests and friends as well!

In between the spooky shenanigans and monster mashing, we just want to take a moment to remind everyone of a few simple but USEFUL tips to make sure that your holiday isn’t just fun, but also SAFE!

STYLIN’ WITH SAFETY

  • When a kid has their mind set on a costume idea, it’s hard to persuade them otherwise. However, there’s no reason they can’t look their best without compromising the safety of your child. Let’s review some tips to make sure your kids costume is safety chic.
  • Check the labels of each costume item such as wigs and fairy wings to make sure they are flame-resistant. If your child has a mask included in their costume, but it’s too big and obstructs their vision, consider using makeup as an alternative.
  • Make sure if you do use makeup, that it’s nontoxic and be sure to try it out on a small area of your skin prior to the big night to avoid any last minute surprises.
  • Never use costume contact lenses without an eye examination and prescription from an eye doctor. The “one size fits all” claim that many of these decorative lenses state on their packaging lead consumers to believe that it’s safe, when in reality these products could cause pain, inflammation, and have the potential to cause permanent eye damage.
  • If a cape or dress is a part of the costume attire, make sure it’s not too lengthy otherwise it could easily create a tripping hazard. Additionally, check to see if that plastic sword included in your son’s knight costume kit isn’t too sharp. If your child were take a tumble, this oversight could lead to a quick end to your Halloween celebrations.
  • Be sure to choose a costume with bright colors and carry a candy bag or bucket that is reflective.

LESS TRICKS, MORE TREATING

  • Nothing beats the practice of walking door to door, saying those three magic words, and receiving that sweet treat in return. It’s understood that the end goal is to collect as much candy as possible. However, we also want to keep our little goblins safe!
  • Be sure that every adult and trick-or-treater has a flashlight on them with fresh batteries.
  • If one of the older kids in the family wants to go out with friends, plan a route with them that you’re comfortable with and set a time you expect them to return home.
  • Only approach a house if there is a porch light on and there are decorations on the house.
  • NEVER enter someone’s home or car for candy— HELLO!!
  • In case of an emergency where you’re in a tricky situation, be sure to have your Emergency SOS settings turned on for your smartphone. Rapid fire the volume and power button, doing so will automatically dial 911 for you.
  • If you see a house with a teal pumpkin outside of it (yes, we said teal), that means that the house is giving out prizes other than candy to accommodate to kids with food allergies and health conscious families.

PUMPKIN CARVING PRECAUTIONS

  • The classic autumnal tradition of pumpkin carving can be dated back to the 1600s. While the craftsmanship of this art has evolved throughout the course of history, the priority of keeping your fingers and hands safe hasn’t!
  • Be sure that there’s always adult supervision and that you’re carving in a clean, well-lit, and dry workspace.
  • Make it a family experience – have the kids draw the design out on the pumpkin with a marker, then have the adults carve it out.
  • Sharper doesn’t always mean better! Use a serrated knife over a straight edge knife as pumpkin skin tends to be thick.
  • To create more intricate carvings, it worthwhile to tape on a paper stencil and trace it onto the pumpkin skin.

BONUS:

Make it a TRUE Woodloch Halloween celebration with these awesome Jack O’ Lantern patterns for your pumpkins! 

2018-10-09T16:07:46+00:00October 11th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized, Fall, Holidays|